Last month in Quilt Making Basics we tackled Half Square Triangles, so this month it seemed only right that we should move on to flying geese as they are somewhat related.

We’re going to look at 3 different methods for geese, starting with the traditional method which involves sewing on the bias to create 4 goose units at once.

    1. First you need to cut your ‘geese’ and your ‘sky’.  For the geese, you need a square which is the width of your finished goose + 1 1/4″, which you then need to cut on both diagonal.  For the sky, you need 4 squares which are the height of your finished goose + 7/8″

 

 

 

    1. To sew them together, take one sky piece and one goose and align on the diagonal, right sides together.  Stitch with a 1/4″ seam allowance, then open out and press:

 

 

 

    1. Next, take another sky piece align on the remaining diagonal, right sides together.  Stitch with a 1/4″ seam allowance, then open out and press:

 

 

The next method, which allows you to make one goose unit at a time, uses rectangles and squares.  This method either wastes a little fabric, or gives you some bonus HSTs, you decide!  I’ll show how to stitch to get the bonus HST.

    1. For this method you start with a goose rectangle which is the finished width + 1/2″ by the finished height + 1/2″.  You will also need 2 squares which are the finished height + 1/2″.  On the back of each square, draw a line on one diagonal, plus another one that is parallel, but 1/2″ to one side.

 

    1. Take your rectangle and place one square right sides together, aligning with one edge.  Stitch along the 2 lines you drew on the back, then cut apart with a 1/4″ seam allowance, open out your goose and your HST and press:

 

 

 

    1. Next, take your remaining square and align at the other end.  Stitch along the 2 lines you drew on the back, then cut apart with a 1/4″ seam allowance, open out your goose and your HST and press:

 

 

The final method is the no waste method, which creates 4 geese at once, but without you having to sew with bias edges:

    1. For this method you need to start with squares as per method 1.  For the geese, you need a square which is the width of your finished goose + 1 1/4″, which you then need to cut on both diagonal.  For the sky, you need 4 squares which are the height of your finished goose + 7/8″.  On the back of each sky square, draw a line on one diagonal.

 

    1. Place the squares as per the diagram below, and stitch 1/4″ on either side of the drawn lines:

 

 

    1. Cut up the drawn line, and open the sky pieces out as per the diagram below for each half:

 

 

    1. Take a remaining sky square and one half of the first unit, then place as per the diagram below.  Stitch 1/4″ on either side of the drawn line.  Repeat for the other half of the first unit:

 

 

    1. Cut up the drawn line and press the sky open on each of the geese:

 

I have to say that I prefer method 2 if I’m making scrappy geese, and method 3 for geese in bulk, but I’ve yet to work out what on earth to do with all the bonus HSTs from method 2!  I have a wee bag of them for when inspiration hits, however…

Because I know you all love it when I do the maths for you, here’s some frequently used goose sizes, and the pieces you’ll need to cut:

Finished Goose Unit Size Method 1 Method 2 Method 3
Goose Cut Square Size Sky Cut Square Size Goose Cut Rectangle Size Sky Cut Square Size Goose Cut Square Size Sky Cut Square Size
1” x 2” 3 ¼” 1 ⅞” 1 ½” x 2 ½” 1 ½” 3 ¼” 1 ⅞”
2” x 4” 5 ¼” 2 ⅞” 2 ½” x 4 ½” 2 ½” 5 ¼” 2 ⅞”
3” x 6” 7 ¼” 3 ⅞” 3 ½” x 6 ½” 3 ½” 7 ¼” 3 ⅞”
4” x 8” 9 ¼” 4 ⅞” 4 ½” x 8 ½” 4 ½” 9 ¼” 4 ⅞”
5” x 10” 11 ¼” 5 ⅞” 5 ½” x 10 ½” 5 ½” 11 ¼” 5 ⅞”

 

 

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